Research References On Vinegar’s Health Properties

You can read the whole article here on the various clinical research conducted on vinegar’s health properties.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1785201/

Here is the summary:

For more than 2000 years, vinegar has been used to flavor and preserve foods, heal wounds, fight infections, clean surfaces, and manage diabetes. Although vinegar is highly valued as a culinary agent, some varieties costing $100 per bottle, much scrutiny surrounds its medicinal use. Scientific investigations do not support the use of vinegar as an anti-infective agent, either topically or orally. Evidence linking vinegar use to reduced risk for hypertension and cancer is equivocal. However, many recent scientific investigations have documented that vinegar ingestion reduces the glucose response to a carbohydrate load in healthy adults and in individuals with diabetes. There is also some evidence that vinegar ingestion increases short-term satiety. Future investigations are needed to delineate the mechanism by which vinegar alters postprandial glycemia and to determine whether regular vinegar ingestion favorably influences glycemic control as indicated by reductions in hemoglobin A1c. Vinegar is widely available; it is affordable; and, as a remedy, it is appealing. But whether vinegar is a useful adjunct therapy for individuals with diabetes or prediabetes has yet to be determined.

Contributor Information
Carol S. Johnston, Department of Nutrition, Arizona State University, Mesa, Arizona.

Cindy A. Gaas, Department of Nutrition, Arizona State University, Mesa, Arizona.

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Articles from Medscape General Medicine are provided here courtesy of WebMD/Medscape Health Network
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